It’s known for its beneficial effects in the bedroom, and now a new study suggests that Viagra could also help men to live longer.

Written by George Citroner

Researchers tested the drug, often referred to as the ‘blue pill’, on men with coronary artery disease – a condition that causes the heart’s blood supply to be blocked or interrupted by a build-up of fatty substances in the coronary arteries.

They found that men who took Viagra not only lived longer, but also had a lower risk of experiencing a new heart attack.

Firstly, men can be offered an injection of alprostadil, which dilates the blood vessels so that the penis stiffens.

Alternatively, men may be offered PDE5 inhibitors, such as Viagra, which are taken orally and inhibit the enzyme phosphodiesterase5 (PDE5) in the penis, increasing blood and resulting in an erection.

It’s known for its beneficial effects in the bedroom, and now a new study suggests that Viagra could also help men to live longer (stock image)

In this study, researchers from the Karolinska Institute in Sweden analyzed 18,500 men with stable coronary artery disease who were being treated for impotence – 16,500 of who were on Viagra, and 2,000 who received alprostadil.

The analysis revealed that men who received Viagra lived longer and had a lower risk of a new heart attack, heart failure, balloon dilation, and bypass surgery than those who received alprostadil.

Dr Martin Holzmann, who led the study, explained: ‘This suggests that there’s a causal relationship, but a registry study can’t answer that question.

‘It is possible that those who received PDE5 inhibitors were healthier than those on alprostadil and therefore had a lower risk.

Dr Hozmann added: ‘Potency problems are common in older men and now our study also shows that PDE5 inhibitors may protect against heart attack and prolong life.’

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