Dr. Shanna Swan has found that chemicals called phthalates are causing human babies to be born with malformed genitals.

By Marthe de Ferrer

A leading epidemiologist and environmental scientist has published a book which examines the link between industrial chemicals and penile length.

Dr Shanna Swan writes that humanity is facing an “existential crisis” in fertility rates as a result of phthalates, a chemical used when manufacturing plastics that impacts the hormone-producing endocrine system.

The book outlines how pollution is leading to higher rates of erectile dysfunction, fertility decline, and growing numbers of babies born with small penises. Though the headline fact about shrinkage may sound like a laughing matter, the research paints a bleak portrait of humanity’s longevity and ability to survive.

As a result of this pollution, a growing number of babies are being born with small penises, Dr Swan writes.

Pollution
Image: Humanity is facing a fertility crisis, says Dr Swan

Her book, titled ‘Count Down’, examines “how our modern world is threatening sperm counts, altering male and female reproductive development, and imperiling the future of the human race”.

She discovered that male human babies who had been exposed to the phthalates in the womb had a shorter anogenital distance – something that correlated with penile volume.

Dr. Swan believes that the rapidly decreasing fertility rate means that most men will be unable to produce viable sperm by 2045.

But there is some good news. Since the creation of the European Environment Agency, European citizens are exposed to 41 per cent less particulate pollution than we were two decades ago.

It’s believed that these regulations have gifted Europeans an extra nine months of life expectancy, on average.

“A demand for change from citizens and subsequent strong policies have helped to clear the air in parts of Europe before, and can continue to do so to ensure that high pollution today does not need to be tomorrow’s fate,” says Michael Greenstone, director of the Energy Politics Institute at the University of Chicago.

So if pollution reduction measures can be properly implemented, there is still hope for the future and humanity’s fertility.

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