By Robin Pogrebin/NYTimes

Facing a potential shortfall of $150 million because of the pandemic, the Metropolitan Museum of Art has begun conversations with auction houses and its curators about selling some artworks to help pay for care of the collection.

A visitor in Gallery 601, one of 21 reinstalled skylit galleries with a range of old masters, including Velázquez, Caravaggio, Guercino, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York on Dec. 21, 2020. Goya, Caravaggio, Rubens, Velázquez and more are in skylit splendor in the European galleries. And the museum is acknowledging the shaping force on art of colonialism, slavery, the disenfranchisement of women. Jeenah Moon/The New York Times.

“This is the time when we need to keep our options open,” said Max Hollein, the Met’s director, in an interview. “None of us have a full perspective on how the pandemic will play out. It would be inappropriate for us not to consider it, when we’re still in this foggy situation.”

Like many institutions, the Met is looking to take advantage of a two-year window in which the Association of Art Museum Directors — a professional organization that guides its members’ best practices — has relaxed the guidelines that govern how proceeds from sales of works in a collection (known as deaccessioning) can be directed.

Read the original article on NY Times

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